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People with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at risk of serious liver disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and remain infectious to others. Because chronic HBV and HCV infections are typically asymptomatic, notification data reflect national screening and testing practices and do not give accurate insights into the prevalence of infections. Thus, to adequately inform primary or secondary prevention efforts, supplementary information such as prevalence data are needed. People with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at risk of serious liver disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and remain infectious to others. Because chronic HBV and HCV infections are typically asymptomatic, notification data reflect national screening and testing practices and do not give accurate insights into the prevalence of infections. Thus, to adequately inform primary or secondary prevention efforts, supplementary information such as prevalence data are needed.   Author: Dr Siamak Tonekaboni
People with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at risk of serious liver disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and remain infectious to others. Because chronic HBV and HCV infections are typically asymptomatic, notification data reflect national screening and testing practices and do not give accurate insights into the prevalence of infections. Thus, to adequately inform primary or secondary prevention efforts, supplementary information such as prevalence data are needed. People with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at risk of serious liver disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and remain infectious to others. Because chronic HBV and HCV infections are typically asymptomatic, notification data reflect national screening and testing practices and do not give accurate insights into the prevalence of infections. Thus, to adequately inform primary or secondary prevention efforts, supplementary information such as prevalence data are needed.   Author: Dr Siamak Tonekaboni
Summary: The pediatric and adolescent population is often overlooked in surveys and the burden of disease is essentially unknown particularly in countries with high prevalence rates. It is imperative to determine the brunt of the disease in the pediatric population to fulfill the WHO’s global HCV elimination goals, also diagnose and cure children at an early age before adolescence and behaviors associated with high risk of transmission.
Summary: Most recent and up to date review on HCV diagnosis by Professor Francesco Negro from University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland. An extensive review on clinical aspects of HCV diagnosis as well as review of most recent technologies and tools available.

HIV Monologues. Saina Behnejad

Summary: Nominated Best Ensemble for Off West End Awards. A great play about HIV stigma and real-life relationships.
Summary: The World Hepatitis Summit is a public policy three day event bringing together a global audience of civil society groups, WHO and its Member States, patient organisations from the World Hepatitis Alliance’s 249 organisational members, policy-makers, public health scientists and funders.
Short review on most exciting advances in viral hepatitis diagnosis extracted from abstracts submitted to forthcoming AASLD event. The most prominent being role of HCV core antigen detection and quantification as new tool for detection and monitoring of viremic patient and as an more economical alternative to NAT or HCV RNA quantification. We also review abstracts about creation of novel web-based tool kits and APPs that encourage people to test and get linked to care.
A personal perspective on how Treatment Action Groups (TAG) help improve access to life saving drugs for Hepatitis C positive patients, but still more needs to be done.  

HEPATITIS E VIRUS

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes self-limiting acute icteric hepatitis and has epidemiological and clinical characteristics similar to those of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. The virus has been responsible for major outbreaks of infection in many developing countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, whilst in industrialised countries of the West it is acquired through zoonotic transmission from animal reservoirs. The infection is particularly serious during pregnancy, whilst progressive liver disease has been described in immunosuppressed individuals who have been transplanted or are HIV positive.  
Response-guided therapy leads to complete cure after three weeks of all-oral triple-direct acting antiviral regimens in non-cirrhotic chronic hepatitis C genotype 1b Chinese subjects (SODAPI study)  

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BBV Review RT @HenryEChang: Sustainable Development Goals for HBV elimination in South Africa: challenges, progress & the road ahead→https://t.co/TCu…
Wednesday, 22 May 2019 09:04
BBV Review RT @grahamscooke: Two helpful pieces on HCV reinfection from @GregDore2 @ProfJohnDillon at a time when we're trying to get access to retrea…
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BBV Review RT @HenryEChang: Biological basis for functional cure of chronic hepatitis B→https://t.co/vGzHbrJkbs via Drs. MG Martinez, Barbara Testoni…
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BBV Review RT @HenryEChang: Prevalence, incidence, & outcome of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in Asia, 1999-2019: a systematic review & meta-anal…
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